LATi visits to companies are always very popular, and the visit to GE Measurement and Control in Groby was no exception. The visit was hosted by the company’s technical leaders, Nigel Scoggins and Jonathan MacGregor, and supported by the company’s senior engineering team, who seemed to enjoy our visit as much as we did. The LATi group felt welcomed and looked after from the minute we arrived in reception, and felt honoured to be one of the first visitors to the impressive new visitor centre.

Steve Jones, Director of Adamson Jones said of the visit: “As someone who has a totally different technical background, what interested me most about the visit to GE Measurement and Control was not the technology as such, but gaining an insight into a business that is tucked away in semi-rural Leicestershire, but is clearly a world leader in its field and – with around 600 employees on site – a very significant part of the local economy. 
 
What became apparent from the presentations and conversations with other attendees as we toured the site was how widely used pressure sensors are in all manner of applications.  The contrast between the manufacturing environment – almost nanoscale engineering under cleanroom conditions – and the hostile environments such as oilfields and undersea pipelines in which the products are installed was also striking.”

Martin Croft, MD of Dynamic Flow Technologies recalls that when LATi was founded over 20 years ago in 1996, Mike Bertioli, the then founder of Druck, which later became to GE Measurement and Control, helped to set up LATi. Martin says, “It was with delight that we went over to Groby to visit the factory, now part of the GE Measurement and Control division.  

From the presentations and conversations with knowledgeable staff and other attendees as we toured the site it was surprising how widely pressure sensors are used in all manner of applications.  The effort to turning out world beating products, 15 years of development for the latest sensors, to the contrast between the manufacturing environment – almost nanoscale engineering under cleanroom conditions – and the hostile environments such as oilfields and undersea pipelines in which the products finally get installed. Together with how much aircraft and travelling abroad still very much rely on the skills and expertise of this company.

GE Measurement and Control’s new Innovation Hub showed how the company is continuing to invest and will certainly aid them in spreading the message of their world class pressure sensing capability far and wide. A thoroughly enjoyable visit.”

Many thanks to the team at GE Measurement and Control for an outstanding visit, and insight into the precision engineering required to design and manufacture pressure sensors for use in extreme and critical environments.

We all feel a little safer knowing that GE Measurement and Control equipment is being used by the major airlines to measure flying altitude, and that the calibration machines manufactured in Groby ensure continued accuracy of those altitude sensors.

 

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